Books I’ve read this summer

Hi everyone,

As part of my new approach to blogging, I’d like to write more about my wider passions. One of them is, and has always been, reading. I’m an avid reader. I’ve had up and downs in my relationship with books but I still get a wonderful feeling when I walk into a bookshop and feel that excitement just before starting a new book.

That’s why I’d like to share a few books I’ve read this summer, the reasons why I loved (or loathed) them and which ones I think you should read too. I know a lot of people say that they don’t have time to read. That’s often not true, because we can all find five minutes a day to do what we love.

Without further ado, here’s the list:

Perfect for the beach! It’s one of those books you can’t put down because the story flows like a movie in your mind and you just want to know how everything will end. The plot in a nutshell: a white supremacist couple has a baby, they ask the black nurse who is supposed to be taking care of the baby to stay away from him, but the baby dies and they hold her responsible. We are then told how the whole trial develops from three points of view: the father, the nurse called Ruth, and Ruth’s lawyer. I really liked it. It made me think about racism from a different perspective, and needless to say this is a very topical issue. By the way, they’re making a movie out of this with none other than Viola Davis and Julia Roberts.

It’s not hard for me to say that this is one of the best books I’ve read in the last few years. First things first – it’s not a novel. It’s book to help you understand how and why the world is at is today, why some countries are powerful and what their weaknesses and strengths are. Most of those can be explained by their geography. Tim Marshall makes you see the world from a different perspective, without never being boring. I highly recommend this book if you are someone who likes politics, keeping yourself up to date with what goes on in the world and if you just want to develop a better understanding of the world’s geography.

My expectations were very high with this book. It’s famous, a classic, and most people have at least heard of it or the movie based on it starring Whoopi Goldberg. I knew nothing about it but the fact that it was about racism. I liked the story, but I didn’t particularly like the way it was told, in an epistolary way. Basically it’s the story of Celie, a black woman and her love for another woman as well as her search for the sister she was separated from, is written in the form of a letter addressed to God. They are also written in the way a woman like her would have written, with many spelling mistakes. I just didn’t like this form of presentation. I would still recommend people read it, although I didn’t find it as powerful as I thought it would be.

This is the right kind of book if you like reading about real crime stories. The book is not too long and it flows very fast, I read it in a day because I found it very hard to put down. It tells the true story of a crime committed in France by a man who killed his family, having lied to them for decades. The book itself was born from the writer’s fascination with the case and with the killer’s story. So they met and exchanged letters and that’s how the book was consequently born.

This is a famous book, from a very good and respected writer so I felt a bit of a responsibility reading it. I have to say that I found it hard to read it at times and the different time shifts difficult to follow. It’s set in India and everything is described in a wonderful way, the style of writing very unique. The story is that of two twins, a boy and a girl, and their cousin who dies in an accident in which the twins are involved, and how their family’s servant, part of the Untouchables caste, is then accused of the death. There’s obviously more than that, as the twins are then separated and meet again only twenty years later.

You’ve probably heard of the TV series which came out this year and had a lot of success in the US. I have only read the book and I can tell you, it’s one worth reading ASAP. It’s written in the form of diary, where the protagonist tells of her existence and everyday life in a fictitious US where the world as it is today has been subverted; there have been nuclear wars and pollution has reached a new high. The new authoritarian regime bases itself on the words of the Bible, and opposition to it is punished with death. Young women have to procreate in order to keep the birth rate high and they are assigned to sterile families where the man, known as the Commander, “rapes” the handmaid assigned to him in order to get her pregnant and keep her baby. It’s far more complicated than this, but I hope this little snippet will stimulate you to get the book and read it.

Is there any book you’d like to recommend me?

xx

Silvia

 

  • I’ve added some of these to my reading list, particularly the Jodi Picoult one! xx

    Beautylymin